Enzyme researchers partner with pioneering AI company

Press/Media: Research

Description

UoP's Centre for Enzyme Innovation has used DeepMind’s ground-breaking AI system to make strides in their research on circular recycling

Period22 Jul 2021 → 11 Aug 2021

Media coverage

4

Media coverage

  • TitleHow AI could supercharge the development of new drugs
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletGenetic Literacy Project
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited States
    Date11/08/21
    DescriptionUnderstanding the shapes of proteins is critical for advancing medicine, but until now, only a fraction of these have been worked out.

    Researchers used a program called AlphaFold to predict the structures of 350,000 proteins belonging to humans and other organisms.
    URLhttps://geneticliteracyproject.org/2021/08/12/how-ai-could-supercharge-the-development-of-new-drugs/
    PersonsJohn McGeehan
  • TitleA.I. Predicts the Shapes of Molecules to Come
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletThe New York Times
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited States
    Date23/07/21
    DescriptionDeepMind has given 3-D structure to 350,000 proteins, including every one made by humans, promising a boon for medicine and drug design.
    URLhttps://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/22/technology/deepmind-ai-proteins-folding.html
    PersonsJohn McGeehan
  • TitleBBC Radio 4 Coverage
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletBBC Radio 4
    Media typeRadio
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    Date22/07/21
    DescriptionUoP's Centre for Enzyme Innovation (CEI) has used DeepMind’s ground-breaking AI system to make strides in their research on circular recycling
    URLhttps://tinyurl.com/3xn5c5fd
    PersonsJohn McGeehan
  • TitleAI developers kick off a revolution in medical research by mapping every protein in the human body
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletThe i
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    Date22/07/21
    DescriptionThe DeepMind protein database could also help feed the world and even solve the plastic crisis, the researchers say.

    In addition to mapping every human protein, they have also mapped and made available the proteomes of 20 other organisms important to biological research, from E.coli to yeast and the fruit fly to the mouse – giving the database a total of 350,000 proteins.
    Producer/AuthorTom Bawden
    URLhttps://inews.co.uk/news/science/ai-developers-revolution-medical-research-mapping-every-protein-human-body-1116279
    PersonsJohn McGeehan

Media contributions

2

Media contributions

  • TitleEnzymes Employed as Sustainable Means of Plastic Recycling
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletAZoCleantech
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    Date11/08/21
    DescriptionResearchers in the BOTTLE Consortium, including from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the University of Portsmouth, have identified using enzymes as a more sustainable approach for recycling polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a common plastic in single-use beverage bottles, clothing, and food packaging that are becoming increasingly relevant in addressing the environmental challenge of plastic pollution
    Producer/AuthorLaura Thomson
    URLhttps://www.azocleantech.com/news.aspx?newsID=29924
    PersonsJohn McGeehan, Andrew Pickford
  • TitleAI breakthrough could spark medical revolution
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletBBC News
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    Date23/07/21
    DescriptionTraditional techniques to work out protein structures include X-ray crystallography, cryogenic electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) and others. But none of these is easy to do: "It takes a huge amount of money and resources to do structures," John McGeehan, a structural biologist at the University of Portsmouth, told BBC News.

    Therefore, the 3D shapes are often determined as part of targeted scientific investigations, but no project until now had systematically determined structures for all the proteins made by the body.
    Producer/AuthorPaul Rincon
    URLhttps://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-57929095
    PersonsJohn McGeehan