2014 Code of Practice: how research evidence on the role and impact of teaching assistants can inform professional practice

Rob Webster*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this article, the author reflects on findings from research on the role and impact of teaching assistants and experience of working as a special educational needs (SEN) officer. Research evidence suggests the reliance on teaching assistants to include pupils with Statements of SEN in mainstream settings masks a collective, though unintentional, failure of educationalists to articulate and provide schools and families of children with SEN with appropriate and pedagogically sound models of inclusive provision. In light of the forthcoming reforms to the SEN system in England, key implications for educational psychologists (EPs) are drawn out, with particular reference to their role in parent liaison during the statutory assessment process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)232-237
Number of pages6
JournalEducational Psychology in Practice
Volume30
Issue number3
Early online date10 Jun 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2014

Keywords

  • Code of Practice 2014
  • inclusion
  • parent liaison
  • Statements
  • statutory assessment
  • teaching assistants

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