Am I missing something by not using storytelling? Why we should ask university students to use storytelling to evaluate their experiences of learning

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Abstract

Evaluations of student’s learning experiences hold increasing currency in deciding how to improve teaching and learning. This article proposes that students who use story-telling for evaluation help to facilitate this. Adding to previous research that shows the benefit and challenges of gathering qualitative feedback, stories written by 47 Childhood Studies undergraduate students while at university in England explain their learning experiences. Analysis of the content of their stories identified what their learning journey had been like providing useful information to shape teaching and support their wellbeing; both important measures for universities because they are factors that influence retention and the number of applicants to their institution. The research concludes that stories written by students are useful because they enable the HE teacher to engage in new ways of listening and responding to personal accounts that communicate what the learning experience is like for students and what is important to them.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321-333
Number of pages13
JournalTeaching in Higher Education
Volume25
Issue number3
Early online date17 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Mar 2020

Keywords

  • storytelling
  • early childhood studies
  • higher education
  • evaluation
  • assessment

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