Arguments for anonymity

H. Webb, Nick Savage, Peter Millard

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Abstract

This research identifies the balance of arguments relating for and against the use of online anonymity in society in the context of linking users to their true identity via real name policies. Survey results were extracted based on occupational status, focussing on both technology students and those in full time employment, which primarily consisted of staff at a High School. This provided a range of awareness and information (for instance with regard to online risk) of which is believed to influence the participants opinions and attitudes. In summary, results suggest students are less inclined to sacrifice the element of freedom and privacy associated with anonymity in comparison to those in full time employment. Students appear more aware and concerned with the barrier and difference between reality and virtual reality and, should they be identifiable, are likely to change their behaviours as a result. However, this measured as less of a concern for those in full time employment, who seemed more inclined than students towards the introduction of real name policies.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Human Aspects of Information Security and Assurance
Subtitle of host publicationHAISA 2015
EditorsSteven M. Furnell, Nathan L. Clarke
PublisherUniversity of Plymouth
Pages141-150
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)978-1-84102-388-5
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2015
Event9th International Symposium on Human Aspects of Information Security and Assurance - Lesvos, Lesvos, Greece
Duration: 1 Jul 20153 Jul 2015
Conference number: 128761

Conference

Conference9th International Symposium on Human Aspects of Information Security and Assurance
Abbreviated titleHAISA 2015
CountryGreece
CityLesvos
Period1/07/153/07/15

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