Associations between self-reported inhibitory control, stress, and alcohol (mis)use during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK: a national cross-sectional study utilising data from four birth cohorts

James M. Clay*, Lorenzo D. Stafford, Matthew O. Parker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

We explored (1) self-reported changes in alcohol use during the pandemic in the UK and (2) the extent to which self-reported inhibitory control and/or stress were associated with any change in drinking behaviour. We used a UK-based cross-sectional online survey administered to four nationally representative birth cohorts (N = 13,453). A significant minority of 30- (29.08%) and 50-year-olds (26.67%) reported drinking more, and between 32.23 and 45.02% of respondents reported feeling more stressed depending on the cohort. Stress was associated with hazardous drinking among 30-year-olds (OR = 3.77, 95% CI 1.15 to 12.28). Impatience was associated with both increased alcohol use (1.14, 95% CI 1.06, 1.24) and hazardous drinking (1.20, 95% CI 1.05, 1.38) among 19-year-olds. Risk-taking was associated with hazardous drinking for 30-year-olds (OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.05, 1.32). These data highlight concerns for those at risk of alcohol misuse and alcohol-related harm during COVID-19 lockdowns.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages22
JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health and Addiction
Early online date3 Aug 2021
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online - 3 Aug 2021

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • COVID-19
  • impulsivity
  • inhibitory control
  • risk-taking
  • stress
  • UKRI
  • ESRC
  • MRC
  • ES/P000673/1

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Associations between self-reported inhibitory control, stress, and alcohol (mis)use during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK: a national cross-sectional study utilising data from four birth cohorts'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this