Behavioural Inhibition System (BIS) sensitivity differentiates EEG responses during goal conflict in a continuous monitoring task

Roger Moore, M. Mills, P. Marshman, P. Corr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Previous research has revealed that EEG theta oscillations are affected during goal conflict processing. This is consistent with the behavioural inhibition system (BIS) theory of anxiety (Gray & McNaughton, 2000). However, studies have not attempted to relate these BIS-related theta effects to BIS personality measures. Confirmation of such an association would provide further support for BIS theory, especially as it relates to trait differences. EEG was measured (32 electrodes) from extreme groups (low/high trait BIS) engaged in a target detection task. Goal conflicts were introduced throughout the task. Results show that the two groups did not differ in behavioural performance. The major EEG result was that a stepwise discriminant analysis indicated discrimination by 6 variables derived from coherence and power, with 5 of the 6 in the theta range as predicted by BIS theory and one in the beta range. Also, across the whole sample, EEG theta coherence increased at a variety of regions during primary goal conflict and showed a general increase during response execution; EEG theta power, in contrast, was primarily reactive to response execution. This is the first study to reveal a three-way relationship between the induction of goal conflict, the induction of theta power and coherence, and differentiation by psychometrically-defined low/high BIS status.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-144
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Psychophysiology
Volume85
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2012

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