Can visual stimulus induce proprioceptive drift in the upper arm using virtual reality?

Dion Willis, Vaughan Powell, Brett Stevens, Wendy Powell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Abstract

Sustained isometric contractions (SIC), such as holding an arm stationary in a space, are often used in upper limb rehabilitation exercises, particularly where it is important to protect the joints and tendons or to reduce patient fatigue. However, visual cues within a virtual environment may have an unanticipated effect on the ability to maintain SIC. This study investigated the influence of background motion within a virtual environment on the ability to maintain a fixed position during an upper limb task. It was found that introducing directional movement had a significant differential effect on the ability to maintain SIC.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 11th International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Assistive Technologies
EditorsP. Sharkey, A. A. Rizzo
PublisherThe University of Reading
Pages383-386
ISBN (Print)978-0-7049-1546-6
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2016
Event11th International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies: ICDVRAT 2016 - Los Angeles, California, United States
Duration: 20 Sep 201622 Sep 2016
http://www.icdvrat.org/
http://www.icdvrat.org/
http://www.icdvrat.org/
http://www.icdvrat.org/

Conference

Conference11th International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles, California
Period20/09/1622/09/16
Internet address

Keywords

  • Virtual reality
  • proprioceptive drift
  • visual cues
  • pub_permission_granted

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