Clinical imaging experts' perspectives on the benefits and risks of sharing diagnostic radiological images with patients

William Cox, Penelope Cavenagh, Fernando Bello

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction - Advancing technologies offer novel opportunities to share with patients their diagnostic radiological images.1;2  This sharing may occur within the clinical environment under the supervision of a clinician, or patients may involve remote, unsupervised access.2  However, the benefits and risks of such practices have not been widely explored.


Methods - A questionnaire was designed to measure respondent attitudes towards benefits and risks of image sharing utilising Likert scale type responses and a free text option.  The questionnaire was distributed to clinical imaging experts.  Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. 


Results - 121 responses were received.  The majority (81.2%, n=95) of respondents agreed that sharing images with patients was ‘a good idea’.  Respondents indicated overall agreement with several factors considered to contribute benefit4; 5; 6 including: 

Understanding – understanding information shared with them (87.6%, n=106) 

Communication – talking with their clinician (76.03%, n=92) and working in partnership (85.13%, n=103) 

Adherence – following their care plan (57.85%, n=70) and managing their own health (53.72%, n=65) 

Several risks were also identified.  These were primarily concerned with: 

Images being difficult for patients to interpret (36.36%, n=45) 

The potential for causing patient anxiety (27.28%, n=33). 


Conclusion - Respondents confirmed that sharing images with patients may provide benefits, but there are risks inherent to this process.   

There is a need, therefore, for further work seeking: 

Clarification of how identified benefits and risks can be effectively managed 

Patients’ perspectives surrounding this process 

 

References


1. Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust.  How it works.  Available at https://www.careinformationexchange-nwl.nhs.uk/ (accessed on 07 November 2017) 

2. Sectra.  Share and collaborate.  Available at https://sectra.com/medical/solutionarea/share-and-collaborate/ (accessed on 07 November 2017) 

3. Cox, WAS, Cavenagh, P. & Bello, F. (2017) The diagnostic radiological image - identifying the benefits from the literature – Poster Presentation.  UKRC/O Congress,  12 - 14 June 2017. Manchester Central Convention Complex. 

4. Adams, RJ. (2010)  Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education, Risk Manag Healthc Policy. 2010; 3: 61–72. 

5. Thompson, L & McCabe, R. (2012) The effect of clinician-patient alliance and communication on treatment adherence in mental health care: a systematic review, BMC Psychiatry, 12:87 

6. Coulter, A. (2012) Patient engagement – what works?, Journal of Ambulatory Care Management, 35(2) 

 

IRAS Project ID 187752 

NHS REC Ref 17/LO/0864 


Original languageEnglish
Publication statusAccepted for publication - Mar 2018
EventUnited Kingdom Radiological and Radiation Oncology Congress - The ACC & Exhibition Centre, Liverpool, United Kingdom
Duration: 2 Jul 20184 Jul 2018
http://ukrco.org.uk

Conference

ConferenceUnited Kingdom Radiological and Radiation Oncology Congress
Abbreviated titleUKRC
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLiverpool
Period2/07/184/07/18
Internet address

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Clinical imaging experts' perspectives on the benefits and risks of sharing diagnostic radiological images with patients'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this