Cognitive effort reduction within group decision making through aggregation and disaggregation of individual preferences

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Most of multicriteria methods require the specification of different preference parameters. This necessitates a considerable cognitive effort from the decision maker, especially for those with no or limited knowledge about multicriteria analysis. The situation is further complicated within a group of decision makers. In this paper, we propose a multicriteria classification approach that relies on an aggregation/disaggregation strategy within a group of decision makers, permitting thus to considerably reduce the needed cognitive effort at individual as well as group levels. The aggregation/disaggregation strategy is known for its ability to reduce the cognitive effort at the level of individual decision makers. At group level, a simple majority rule is used to generate consensual decisions with no additional information from the decision makers. A didactic example is used to illustrate the proposed approach.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInformation and Knowledge Systems: Digital Technologies, Artificial Intelligence, and Decision Making
EditorsInès Saad, Camille Rosenthal-Sabroux, Faiez Gargouri, Pierre-Emmanuel Arduin
PublisherSpringer
Publication statusAccepted for publication - 6 May 2021
Event5th International Conference on Information and Knowledge Systems: ICIKS 2021 -
Duration: 22 Jun 202123 Jun 2021

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Business Information Processing
PublisherSpringer
ISSN (Print)1865-1348

Conference

Conference5th International Conference on Information and Knowledge Systems
Period22/06/2123/06/21

Keywords

  • Group Decision Making
  • Aggregation/Disaggregation Approach
  • Cognitive effort
  • Majority Principle

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