Composite ceramic bone graft substitute in the treatment of locally aggressive benign bone tumours.

O. S. Schindler*, S. R. Cannon, T. W. R. Briggs, G. W. Blunn

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To report the use of a composite ceramic bone graft substitute containing calcium sulphate and hydroxyapatite (HA) in the treatment of large expansive osteolytic benign bone tumours.

Methods: 4 women and 9 men aged 8 to 49 (mean, 22) years with aneurysmal bone cysts (n=6) or giant cell tumours (n=7) in the epi- or meta-physeal areas of the lower limbs underwent curettage, phenolisation, and filling with bone graft substitute containing calcium sulphate and HA. The mean tumour size was 38.5 (range, 18-65) ml. The patients were followed up for a mean of 41 (range, 33-52) months. Range of movement, Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Rating Score (MTSRS), and haematological and blood biochemical parameters were measured.

Results: Two patients had recurrence at 7 and 9 months, both progressed to grade-III giant cell tumours. One underwent revision with an iliac crest autograft, whereas the other underwent en bloc excision and prosthetic replacement. The 11 other lesions displayed clinical and radiological consolidation at a mean of 4.6 (range, 3-7) months. No restriction of range of movement was observed, except in the patient undergoing prosthetic replacement. The mean MTSRS was 96% (range, 83-100%) of that expected for normal function. During the follow-up period, haematological and blood biochemical parameters stayed within normal limits.

Conclusion: Composite bioceramic osteoconductive grafts, which combine porous HA with calcium sulphate, provide a framework for human osteogenesis and avoid donor-site morbidity (autologous bone graft harvesting). Tumour recurrence remains a major concern especially in young patients, as revision invariably requires removal of additional bone, potentially compromising joint integrity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-74
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Surgery
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2008

Keywords

  • bone cysts
  • aneurysmal
  • bone neoplasms
  • bone substitutes
  • giant cell tumor of bone

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