Constraining the time span between the Early Holocene Hasseldalen and Askja-S tephras through varve counting in the Lake Czechowskie sediment record, Poland

Florian Ott, Sabine Wulf, Johanna Serb, Michal Slowinski, Milena Obremska, Rik Tjallingii, Miroslaw Blaszkiewicz, Achim Brauer

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    Abstract

    We report the first findings of coexisting early Holocene Hässeldalen and Askja-S cryptotephras in a varved sediment record in Lake Czechowskie (Poland). A time span of 152 +11/−8 varve years between the two tephras has been revealed by differential dating through varve counting. This is in agreement within the uncertainties with calculations from radiocarbon-based age models from the non-varved Hässeldala port record in southern Sweden, but shorter than assumed from the non-varved lake record on the Faroe Islands. We discuss possible reasons for the observed differences in duration between the two tephras and provide a revised absolute age for the Askja-S tephra of 11 228 ± 226 cal a BP based on anchoring our floating varve chronology to the absolute timescale by using the Hässeldalen Tephra as dated in the Hässeldala port sediments (11 380 ± 216 cal a BP). This age agrees with radiocarbon age models with larger uncertainty ranges, but is slightly older than radiocarbon-based age models with narrow uncertainty bands and is even 200–300 years older than the age reported from the Faroe Islands record. In addition to these chronological issues we discuss the possible response of the Czechowskie sediment record to the Preboreal climate oscillation.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)103–113
    Number of pages11
    JournalJournal of Quaternary Science
    Volume31
    Issue number2
    Early online date16 Mar 2016
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 16 Apr 2016

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