Economic assessment of sustainable blue energy and marine mining resources linked to African large marine ecosystems

Asmerom M. Gilau, Pierre Failler

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Abstract

African sustainable energy and marine mineral resources have the potential for significant contributions to African economic development goals through job creation and contributions to the Gross Domestic Product of the countries bordering the seven African Large Marine Ecosystems – Canary Current, Mediterranean Sea, Red Sea, Somali Coastal Current, Agulhas Current, Benguela Current and the Guinea Current. Though their potential is not fully assessed, based on our preliminary assessment it is expected that by 2030 and 2063 blue energy could add value of about USD1.6 billion and USD2.3 billion, in mining of minerals about USD76 billion and USD123 billion, and in oil and gas production about USD100 billion and USD138 billion, respectively. By 2030 and 2063 blue energy employment can reach about 0.2 million and 0.5 million jobs, in ocean mining about 2 million and 4 million jobs could be created, and in oil and gas production about 1.8 million and 5 million jobs would be expected. In order to achieve these benefits, Africans need to tackle complex technical and policy related challenges. Among the recommended changes, it would be necessary to unlock sustainable blue energy regulations with forward looking new development policies.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEnvironmental Development
Early online date3 Sep 2020
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online - 3 Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Ocean energy
  • blue energy
  • African Large Marine Ecosystems
  • deep-sea-bed mining
  • oil and gas
  • seawater mining
  • innovative industries
  • job creation
  • GDP

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