Education and political socialisation of a national-colonial political elite in French West Africa, 1936-47

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

227 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Much has been written about the first generation of political leaders of French West Africa, their leadership skills, personal resources and networks. Their attachment to, and close links with, France played a crucial role in determining the pattern of decolonisation in the colony. Through a study of their political socialisation, this article seeks to throw light on the experiences and influences that fashioned their thinking about politics and created a common stock of ideas, norms and values. Focusing in particular on their education at the William Ponty School and two key moments that shaped their political thinking, the Popular Front period (1936-38) and the immediate post-war period (1944-47), it will be argued that an appreciation of their process of political socialisation enhances our understanding of their political choices. A final section reflects on the legacy of this process in the postcolonial period.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)437-458
Number of pages22
JournalThe Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Education and political socialisation of a national-colonial political elite in French West Africa, 1936-47'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this