Effects of thermal stress on the growth of an intertidal population of Ellisolandia elongata (Rhodophyta) from N-W Mediterranean Sea

Matteo Nannini, Lucia De Marchi, Chiara Lombardi, Federica Ragazzola

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Abstract

Abstract Coralline algae are calcareous algae able to build biogenic structures, thus playing a key-role as marine biodiversity promoters and calcium carbonate producers. The aim was to estimate the growth of Ellisolandia elongata under thermal stress. E. elongata were cultured for 2, 4 and 6 months under “natural” temperature (Tc) and increased temperature (Ti=Tc+3°C). In order to determine a possible culturing effect, growth in the field was also measured. For the first time, Alizarin Red S dye was used in high energy shallow water environments. Thallus linear extension was higher in the cultured specimens (Tc and Ti) compared to the field specimens. The carbonate mass in the field was higher than in Ti and Tc after 2, 4 months but decreased after 6 months. Partly unknown in situ environmental factors could have affected growth and calcification rates in the field while thermal adaptation could explain growth rates in the culturing experiment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11-19
JournalMarine Environmental Research
Volume112
Issue numberPart B
Early online date14 May 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2015

Keywords

  • Climate Changes
  • coralline algae
  • temperature
  • linear extension
  • calcium carbonate mass
  • 6 month experiment

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