Gambling behaviour among undergraduates: the role of social support and peer relations

Chidozie Mabia*, Kizto Okonkwo, Ifenna Ezeanya, Paschal Kandilichukwu Officha, Chidiebere Udensi, Emeka Nwankwo, Nneka Nwangwu, Ogechukwu Okonkwo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined gambling behaviour among undergraduates; the moderating role of social support and peer relations. 223 undergraduates participated in the study. They include 132 females and 91 males whose ages ranged from17- 31years(mean age 21.94; std 3.02). A mixed sampling design involving simple random and accidental samplings was used to select the faculties, departments and participants that participated in the study. Three instruments (Gambling Urge Scale, multidimensional scale of perceived social support and Index of Peer Relation scales) were used to collect data for the study. The study adopted correlational design and hierarchical multiple regression statistics were used to analyze the data. The result shows that models for each of the hierarchies were significant, R2 =(.12and.05andF values for these three hierarchies are 9.750**, 10.760**) respectively. The result shows that family social support is positively correlated with gambling behaviour but not significant (r = .059, P>.05), Significant others social support negatively correlated with gambling behaviour but not significant (r = -.036, P>.05), while Friends social support positively and significantly correlated with gambling behaviour(r = .238**, p<.01), and peer relations negatively and significantly correlated with gambling behaviour (r = -.146*, P<.05). The result further showed in model 1thatfamily and significant others social support did not predict gambling behaviour(ß=-.357, , t = -1.91, P =.057, ß =.072, t = -.557, P=.573.) respectively while friends positively and significantly predicted gambling behaviour, ß =.573**, t =4.680,p < .01. The second model result shows that peer relations negatively and significantly predicted gambling behaviours, ß =.434**,, t = -3.505, p < .01. The results may have implication for understanding, planning and designing programmes for prevention of gambling. Recommendations were based on the findings. It was recommended that input from friends social support and peer relations are important variables that can encourage gambling behaviours.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)146-156
Number of pages11
JournalNigerian Journal of Psychology
Volume23
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 4 Sept 2023

Keywords

  • Gambling Behaviour
  • Social support
  • Peer relations

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