Lactobacillus cell‐free supernatant as a novel bioagent and biosurfactant against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the prevention and treatment of orthopedic implant infection

Augustina Jeyanathan, Rita Ramalhete, Gordon Blunn, Hannah Gibbs, Cyrus Anthony Pumilia, Teerin Meckmongkol, John Lovejoy, Melanie J. Coathup

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The hypothesis was that probiotic Lactobacillus species (spp.) or their cell‐free supernatant (CFS) are effective in inhibiting (a) planktonic growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), (b) its adhesion to a Ti6Al4V‐alloy surface, and (c) in dispersing biofilm once formed. (a) A planktonic co‐culture containing PA(104 colony‐forming unit [CFU]/ml) was combined with either Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum (LP), or Lactobacillus fermentum (LF) at a suspension of 104 (1:1) or 108 CFU/ml (1:2). Lactobacillus and PA CFUs were then quantified. (b) Ti‐6Al‐4V discs were inoculated with PA followed by supplementation with CFS and adherent PA quantified. (c) Biofilm covered discs were supplemented with Lactobacillus CFS and remaining PA activity quantified. Results showed that whole‐cell cultures were ineffective in preventing PA growth; however, the addition of CFS resulted in a 99.99 ± 0.003% reduction in adherent PA in all Lactobacillus groups (p < .05 in all groups) with no viable PA growth measured in the LF and LP groups. Following PA biofilm formation, CFS resulted in a significant reduction in PA activity in all Lactobacillus groups (p ≤ .05 in all groups) with a 29.75 ± 15.98% increase measured in control samples. Supplementation with CFS demonstrated antiadhesive, antibiofilm, and toxic properties to PA.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials
Early online date26 Feb 2021
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online - 26 Feb 2021

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