Intrinsic osteoinductivity of porous titanium scaffold for bone tissue engineering

Maryam Tamaddon, Sorousheh Samizadeh, Ling Wang, Gordon Blunn, Chaozong Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

75 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Large bone defects and nonunions are serious complications that are caused by extensive trauma or tumour. As traditional therapies fail to repair these critical-sized defects, tissue engineering scaffolds can be used to regenerate the damaged tissue. Highly porous titanium scaffolds, produced by selective laser sintering with mechanical properties in range of trabecular bone (compressive strength 35 MPa and modulus 73 MPa), can be used in these orthopaedic applications, if a stable mechanical fixation is provided. Hydroxyapatite coatings are generally considered essential and/or beneficial for bone formation; however, debonding of the coatings is one of the main concerns. We hypothesised that the titanium scaffolds have an intrinsic potential to induce bone formation without the need for a hydroxyapatite coating. In this paper, titanium scaffolds coated with hydroxyapatite using electrochemical method were fabricated and osteoinductivity of coated and noncoated scaffolds was compared in vitro. Alizarin Red quantification confirmed osteogenesis independent of coating. Bone formation and ingrowth into the titanium scaffolds were evaluated in sheep stifle joints. The examinations after 3 months revealed 70% bone ingrowth into the scaffold confirming its osteoinductive capacity. It is shown that the developed titanium scaffold has an intrinsic capacity for bone formation and is a suitable scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5093063
JournalInternational Journal of Biomaterials
Volume2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jul 2017

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Intrinsic osteoinductivity of porous titanium scaffold for bone tissue engineering'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this