Investigating the influence of architecture and material composition of 3D printed anatomical design scaffolds for large bone defects

Evangelos Daskalakis, Fengyuan Liu, Boyang Huang, Anil A. Acar, Glen Cooper, Andrew Weightman, Gordon Blunn, Bahattin Koç, Paulo Bartolo

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Abstract

There is a significant unmet clinical need to prevent amputations due to large bone loss injuries. We are addressing this problem by developing a novel, cost-effective osseointegrated prosthetic solution based on the use of modular pieces, bone bricks, made with biocompatible and biodegradable materials that fit together in a Lego-like way to form the prosthesis. This paper investigates the anatomical designed bone bricks with different architectures, pore size gradients, and material compositions. Polymer and polymer-composite 3D printed bone bricks are extensively morphological, mechanical, and biological characterized. Composite bone bricks were produced by mixing polycaprolactone (PCL) with different levels of hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tri-calcium phosphate (TCP). Results allowed to establish a correlation between bone bricks architecture and material composition and bone bricks performance. Reinforced bone bricks showed improved mechanical and biological results. Best mechanical properties were obtained with PCL/TCP bone bricks with 38 double zig-zag filaments and 14 spiral-like pattern filaments, while the best biological results were obtained with PCL/HA bone bricks based on 25 double zig-zag filaments and 14 spiral-like pattern filaments.
Original languageEnglish
Article number268
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Bioprinting
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • biomanufacturing
  • bone grafts
  • hydroxyapatite
  • polycaprolactone
  • β-Tri-calcium phosphate
  • tissue engineering
  • RCUK
  • EPSRC
  • EP/R01513/1

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