Investigating the risk factors for contraction and diagnosis of human tuberculosis in Indonesia using data from the fifth wave of RAND’s Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS-5)

Nathan Adam*, Sasee Pallikadavath, Marianna Cerasuolo, Mark Amos

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) is a globally widespread disease, with approximately a quarter of the world’s population currently infected (WHO, 2018). Some risk factors (e.g., HIV status, nutrition and body mass) have already been thoroughly investigated. However, little attention has been given to behavioural and/or psychological risk factors (e.g., stress and education level). In this study, risk factors were investigated via statistical analyses of publicly available data from the most recent wave (2015) of the Indonesian Family Life survey (IFLS 5). For comparison and completeness, variables were divided into levels: individual, household, and community. The most prominent and interesting variables which influence TB diagnosis (on each level) were investigated, and a logistic regression was subsequently developed to understand the extent to which each risk factor acted as a predictor for being diagnosed with TB. Age, health benefit or insurance, stress at work, and living in a rural area all showed significant association with TB diagnosis. The outcomes of this study suggest that suitable control measures, such as BCG vaccinations, schemes for improving mental health/stress reduction, and improved access to healthcare in rural areas should be implemented to address each of the key factors identified.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Biosocial Science
Early online date17 Aug 2020
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online - 17 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • risk factors
  • logistic regression
  • tuberculosis

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