Learning lessons from international education in crisis research: supporting early years teachers in England as they return from the Covid-19 pandemic

Nicola Fairchild*, Ann Emerson, Sukh Hamilton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

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Abstract

This chapter will apply lessons learned from the humanitarian sectors’ decades of international education in crisis research to the UK’s real-time phased return to Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) settings following the Covid-19 lockdown. ECEC teachers contribute to strong early attachments and stability of routines that are key for supporting a young child’s personal, social and emotional well-being. Although these principles are normally embedded in most ECEC practice, during the time of Covid-19 new ways of relating to others due to social distancing measures may upset these routines, attachments, and social interactions that are critical for young children. The authors apply lessons learned from decades of international education in time of crisis. Drawing on intersectional and postcolonial approaches the authors consider how scholars and organizations from the Global South can bring a new dimension to ECEC practice. This provides policy makers and ECEC Teachers the opportunity to develop their skill sets to support transitions both back to settings post lockdown.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPreparing Early Childhood Teachers for Managing Emergencies
EditorsHannah O. Ajayi, Emmanuel Grupper, Simeon Sunday Fowowe, Tom Cassidy, Emily Ashton
PublisherIGI Global
Chapter11
Pages152-171
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9781799870210
ISBN (Print)1799870200, 9781799870203, 9781668460146
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Apr 2022

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