Negotiating mobility: royal dockyard workers as railway excursion agents and social entrepreneurs, 1880-1918

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Abstract

From their creation in the mid-nineteenth century in Britain railway excursions provided working people with the means to expand their horizons and create new opportunities for identity- and money-making. This article explores the role of the social entrepreneur and their affect on social mobility. It also re-evaluates working-class leisure in the south of England and challenges the notion that the working-classes were not proactive in establishing their own unique commercial leisure cultures. Using a case study of two dockyard excursion enterprises, which were operated as side line ventures by skilled artisans of the Royal Dockyard in Portsmouth, Hampshire, UK, the article will demonstrate how local working-class access to travel and cultural experiences were broadened and transformed through their initiatives and analyse the role and influence of these men on their co-workers and in wider society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-151
Number of pages21
JournalThe Journal of Transport History
Volume43
Issue number1
Early online date15 Dec 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2022

Keywords

  • dockyard
  • entrepreneur
  • excursion
  • leisure
  • mobility
  • railway
  • working-class

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