Neo-liberal economic policies: impact on the fisheries of Chile, Mexico and Peru

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

    Abstract

    Fisheries policy in the major Latin fishing nations has historically reflected prevailing macroeconomic development strategies. This is particularly notable with respect to neo-liberalism, the development doctrine that has been applied since 1973 in Chile, from 1982 in Mexico and from 1990 in Peru. Trade liberalisation was adjudged to be essential if exports were to be stimulated, the competitiveness of domestic production against imports improved, and the debt overhang reduced. Standard policy recommendations can be decomposed into two elements. First, trade de-regulation (tariff – import and export – reduction, converting specific into ad valorem tariffs, eliminating non-tariff barriers). Second, through the liberalisation of foreign-exchange markets (exchange-rate unification, the elimination of preferential access to foreign currency). Less emphasised, though indisputably important, are the specific schemes introduced to promote exports.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 1999
    EventEXPO'98 Conference on Ocean Food Webs and Economic Productivity - Lisbon, Portugal
    Duration: 1 Jul 19983 Jul 1998

    Conference

    ConferenceEXPO'98 Conference on Ocean Food Webs and Economic Productivity
    Country/TerritoryPortugal
    CityLisbon
    Period1/07/983/07/98

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