Perceptions of people with motor neurone disease, families and HSCPs: a literature review

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Abstract

Motor neurone disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a rapidly progressive terminal neurodegenerative condition caused by degeneration of the upper and lower motor neurones in the central nervous system of the brain. The effects of motor neurone disease are multifaceted, leading to many adjustments in everyday life. This literature review asked what the experiences of people living with motor neurone disease was before and during the COVID-19 pandemic and during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially in terms of their condition and the support they received from health and social care services. A key theme identified was lack of knowledge among professionals when they cared for people living with motor neurone disease and their families. This lack of knowledge often resulted in delayed diagnosis and poor standards of care. COVID-19 impacted on the care of people living with motor neurone disease and their families, and there is a paucity of evidence on how services were perceived by these groups during the COVID-19 pandemic. The experiences of people living with motor neurone disease and their families are currently missing in the literature. In conclusion, further studies are required to include care of people living with motor neurone disease and their families.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)188-198
Number of pages11
JournalBritish Journal of Community Nursing
Volume27
Issue number4
Early online date30 Mar 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Apr 2022

Keywords

  • motor neurone disease
  • amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • palliative care
  • end-of-life care
  • healthcare professionals
  • COVID-19

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