Pharmacists in pharmacovigilance: can increased diagnostic opportunity in community settings translate to better vigilance?

Paul Rutter, David Brown, J. Howard, C. Randall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

The pharmacy profession has undergone substantial change over the last two to three decades. Whilst medicine supply still remains a central function, pharmacist’s roles and responsibilities have become more clinic and patient focused. In the community (primary care), pharmacists have become important providers of healthcare as Western healthcare policy advocates patient self-care. This has resulted in pharmacists taking on greater responsibility in managing minor illness and the delivery of public health interventions. These roles require pharmacists to more fully use their clinical skills, and often involve diagnosis and therapeutic management. Community pharmacists are now, more than ever before, in a position to identify, record and report medication safety incidents. However, current research suggests that diagnostic ability of community pharmacists is questionable and they infrequently report to local or national schemes. The aim of this paper is to highlight current practice and suggest ways in which community pharmacy can more fully contribute to patient safety.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)465-469
JournalDrug Safety
Volume37
Issue number4
Early online date21 Jun 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2014

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