Rape reporting to the police: exploring the social psychological impact of a persuasive campaign on cognitions, attitudes, normative expectations and reporting Intentions

F. Winkel, Aldert Vrij

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Sexual victimizations are generally under-reported to the police. Persuasive communication campaigns are suggested as a feasible instrument to stimulate victim-reporting. Determinants of reporting decisions are reviewed. This review results in a working model to design and evaluate such persuasion campaigns. In the experiment the social psychological impact of a specially designed persuasive programme is explored. Results suggest that this programme is successful in changing the perceived likelihood of positive outcomes associated with reporting, and in strengthening the perceived normative expectations to report, held by others in the potential victim's environment. Some suggestions for countering possible side-effects are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-294
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Review of Victimology
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1993

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