Rates of voluntary and compulsory psychiatric inpatient treatment in England: an ecological study investigating associations with deprivation and demographics

Patrick Keown, Orla McBride, Lizbeth Ellen Twigg, David Crepaz-Keay, Eva Cyhlarova, Helen Parsons, Jan Scott, Kamaldeep Bhui, Scott Weich

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Abstract

Background: Individual variables and area level variables have been identified as explaining much of the variance in rates of compulsory inpatient treatment.

Aims:  Describe rates of voluntary and compulsory psychiatric inpatient treatment in rural and urban settings in England, and to explore the associations with age, ethnicity and deprivation.

Method: Secondary analysis of 2010/11 data from the Mental Health Minimum Dataset.

Results: Areas with higher levels of deprivation had increased rates of inpatient treatment. Areas with high proportions of adults aged 20-39 years had the highest rates of compulsory inpatient treatment as well as the lowest rates of voluntary inpatient treatment. Urban settings had higher rates of compulsory inpatient treatment and ethnic density was associated with compulsory treatment in these areas. After adjusting for age, deprivation, and urban/rural setting, the association between ethnicity and compulsory treatment was not statistically significant.

Conclusions: Age structure of the adult population and ethnic density along with higher levels of deprivation can account for the markedly higher rates of compulsory inpatient treatment in urban areas.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-161
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume209
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2016

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