Reducing meat consumption at work and at home: facilitators and barriers that influence contextual spillover

Caroline Verfuerth, Diana Gregory-Smith, Caroline J. Oates, Christopher R. Jones, Panayiota Alevizou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study contributes to conflicting knowledge on contextual spillover effects from the workplace to the home setting (i.e. knock-on effects of one behaviour to another). A social marketing intervention was staged in a canteen in which red meat meals were replaced with white meat and plant-based alternatives, together with an information campaign. Thirteen employees were interviewed twice (pre- and post-intervention totalling 26 interviews). The findings indicated a two-way pathway framework (for positive and lack of spillover) which is supported by a range of factors. The findings allowed the grouping of factors into facilitators and barriers of contextual spillover and a three-dimensional typology. Overall, the findings showed that a social marketing intervention in a workplace can lead to sustainable food consumption at home. These effects are influenced by barriers and facilitators which can lead to the manifestation of other types of behaviour or a lack thereof. Resulting practical implications are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)671-702
JournalJournal of Marketing Management
Volume37
Issue number7-8
Early online date2 Mar 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 May 2021

Keywords

  • Contextual spillover
  • workplace setting
  • home setting
  • social marketing intervention
  • meat consumption

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