Robotic rectal cancer surgery in obese patients may lead to better short-term outcomes when compared to laparoscopy: a comparative propensity scored match study

Sofoklis Panteleimonitis, Oliver Pickering, Hassan Abbas, Mick Harper, Ngianga Kandala, Nuno Figueiredo, Tahseen Qureshi, Amjad Parvaiz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

103 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Purpose: Laparoscopic rectal surgery in obese patients is technically challenging. The technological advantages of robotic instruments can help overcome some of those challenges, but whether this translates to superior short-term outcomes is largely unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the short-term surgical outcomes of obese (BMI ≥ 30) robotic and laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery patients.

Methods: All consecutive obese patients receiving laparoscopic and robotic rectal cancer resection surgery from three centres, two from the UK and one from Portugal, between 2006 and 2017 were identified from prospectively collated databases. Robotic surgery patients were propensity score matched with laparoscopic patients for ASA grade, neoadjuvant radiotherapy and pathological T stage. Their short-term outcomes were examined.

Results: A total of 222 patients were identified (63 robotic, 159 laparoscopic). The 63 patients who received robotic surgery were matched with 61 laparoscopic patients. Cohort characteristics were similar between the two groups. In the robotic group, operative time was longer (260 vs 215 min; p = 0.000), but length of stay was shorter (6 vs 8 days; p = 0.014), and thirty-day readmission rate was lower (6.3% vs 19.7%; p =  0.033).

Conclusions: In this study population, robotic rectal surgery in obese patients resulted in a shorter length of stay and lower 30-day readmission rate but longer operative time when compared to laparoscopic surgery. Robotic rectal surgery in the obese may be associated with a quicker post-operative recovery and reduced morbidity profile. Larger-scale multi-centre prospective observational studies are required to validate these results.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1079-1086
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Colorectal Disease
Volume33
Issue number8
Early online date25 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

Keywords

  • robotic
  • laparoscopic
  • rectal cancer surgery
  • obese

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Robotic rectal cancer surgery in obese patients may lead to better short-term outcomes when compared to laparoscopy: a comparative propensity scored match study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this