Seasonal heterogeneity and a link to precipitation in the release of microplastic during COVID-19 outbreak from the Greater Jakarta area to Jakarta Bay, Indonesia

Muhammad Reza Cordova, Yaya Ihya Ulumuddin, Triyoni Purbonegoro, Rachma Puspitasari, Nur Fitriah Afianti, Ricky Rositasari, Deny Yogaswara, Muhammad Hafizt, Marindah Yulia Iswari, Nurul Fitriya, Ernawati Widyastuti, Harmesa, Lestari, Irfan Kampono, Muhammad Taufik Kaisupy, Singgih Prasetyo Adi Wibowo, Riyana Subandi, Sofia Yuniar Sani, Lilik Sulistyowati, NurhasanahAhmad Muhtadi, Etty Riani, Simon M. Cragg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To reduce microplastic contamination in the environment, we need to better understand its sources and transit, especially from land to sea. This study examines microplastic contamination in Jakarta's nine river outlets. Microplastics were found in all sampling intervals and areas, ranging from 4.29 to 23.49 particles m−3. The trend of microplastic contamination tends to increase as the anthropogenic activity towards Jakarta Bay from the eastern side of the bay. Our study found a link between rainfall and the abundance of microplastic particles in all river outlets studied. This investigation found polyethylene, polystyrene, and polypropylene in large proportion due to their widespread use in normal daily life and industrial applications. Our research observed an increase in microplastic fibers made of polypropylene over time. We suspect a relationship between COVID-19 PPE waste and microplastic shift in our study area. More research is needed to establish how and where microplastics enter rivers.
Original languageEnglish
Article number113926
Number of pages13
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
Volume181
Early online date13 Jul 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2022

Keywords

  • microplastics
  • abundance
  • COVID-19
  • pandemic
  • river outlet
  • Jakarta Bay
  • UKRI
  • NERC
  • NE/V009516/1

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