Sex differences in interpreting male-female dyad interactions: males' predominance in perceiving sexual intent

Aldert Vrij, E. Kirby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A study is reported investigating gender differences in judging the behaviour of males and females during mixed-dyad conversations and the impact of the endorsement of rape myths in explaining these gender differences. A total of 51 males and 40 females watched a videotape of a male actor and female actor verbally interacting in a social environment and were asked to give their impression about this interaction. They were also requested to fill in the Rape Myths Acceptance Scale (1980). Results revealed that compared to females, males had a stronger tendency to see the interaction in sexual terms. Also, male participants endorsed rape myths more strongly. Finally, gender differences in rape myth endorsements accounted for gender differences in perceiving male-female mixed-dyad interactions to alimited extent. Implications of the findings are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-297
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Review of Victimology
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2002

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