Technology as a key tool for the prosecution of international crimes: lessons from Uganda

Tonny Raymond Kirabira

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Abstract

This article uses the context of Uganda to examine the role of technology in the prosecution of international crimes. It uses the International Criminal Court(ICC)complementarity framework to analyse two cases- Dominic Ongwen and Thomas Kwoyelo, exploring a question - whether the use of technology enhances the ICC’s positive complementarity approach? The article draws substantially from the review of empirical literature, qualitative interviews and the author’s work experiences at the two sites of justice - Uganda and The Hague. The article reveals a practical overlap between the two sites of justice in the use of digital evidence and witness protection. It is argued that use of technology enhances the criminal trial procedures, victims’ rights and the legitimacy of the courts. It is equally argued that the use of technology has the potential to enhance the ICC’s complementarity approach. The article contributes to current debates about the role of technology in international criminal justice.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Criminal Law Review
Early online date22 Nov 2021
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online - 22 Nov 2021

Keywords

  • international criminal justice-technology
  • International Criminal Court (ICC)
  • International Crimes Division (ICD)
  • complementarity
  • Uganda
  • legitimacy

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