The first cut is the deepest: repeated interactions of coauthorship and academic productivity in Nobel laureate teams

Ho Fai Chan, Ali Onder, Benno Torgler*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

123 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Despite much in-depth investigation of factors influencing the coauthorship evolution in various scientific fields, our knowledge about how efficiency or creativity is linked to the longevity of collaborative relationships remains very limited. We explore what Nobel laureates’ coauthorship patterns reveal about the nature of scientific collaborations looking at the intensity and success of scientific collaborations across fields and across laureates’ collaborative lifecycles in physics, chemistry, and physiology/medicine. We find that more collaboration with the same researcher is actually no better for advancing creativity: publications produced early in a sequence of repeated collaborations with a given coauthor tend to be published better and cited more than papers that come later in the collaboration with the same coauthor. Our results indicate that scientific collaboration involves conceptual complementarities that may erode over a sequence of repeated interactions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)509-524
Number of pages16
JournalScientometrics
Volume106
Issue number2
Early online date30 Nov 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016

Keywords

  • Innovation
  • Nobel laureates
  • Scientific collaboration
  • Team formation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The first cut is the deepest: repeated interactions of coauthorship and academic productivity in Nobel laureate teams'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this