The future of infant and young children's food: food supply/manufacturing and human health challenges in the 21st century

Carina Venter, Kate Maslin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Infant food and weaning practices are highly debated with lots of unanswered questions. It is becoming more apparent that early-life feeding may have an effect on the long-term health of humans, particularly for noncommunicable diseases such as obesity and allergic diseases. It is important to understand how environmental influences in early life can affect the development of the immune system and metabolic profiling. In terms of nutrition and diet, one should consider the role of the total/whole diet, as well as particular nutrients in the development of noncommunicable diseases. Providing the appropriate nutrition for infants during the weaning age needs to address factors such as the microbial load of the food, nutrient composition, presence/absence of allergens and appropriate textures. These factors are of importance irrespective of whether the food is homemade or produced commercially, and need to take environmental factors and food resources into account.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPreventive aspects of early nutrition
EditorsM. S. Fewtrell, F. Salzburg, S. L. Prescott
PublisherKarger Medical & Scientific Publishers
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-318-05643-3
ISBN (Print)978-3-318-05642-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Apr 2016
Event85th Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 17 Nov 201419 Nov 2014

Publication series

NameNestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
PublisherKarger
Volume85
ISSN (Print)1664-2147
ISSN (Electronic)1664-2155

Conference

Conference85th Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period17/11/1419/11/14

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