The increased prevalence of Vibrio species and the first reporting of Vibrio jasicida and Vibrio rotiferianus at UK shellfish sites

Jamie Harrison, Kathryn Nelson, Helen Morcrette, Cyril Morcrette, Joanne Preston, Luke David Helmer, Richard Titball, Clive Butler, Sariqa Wagley*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Warming sea-surface temperature has led to an increase in the prevalence of Vibrio species in marine environments. This can be observed particularly in temperate regions where conditions for their growth has become more favourable. The increased prevalence of pathogenic Vibrio species has resulted in a worldwide surge of Vibriosis infections in human and aquatic animals. This study uses sea-surface temperature data around the English and Welsh coastlines to identify locations where conditions for the presence and growth of Vibrio species is favourable. Shellfish samples collected from three locations that were experiencing an increase in sea-surface temperature were found to be positive for the presence of Vibrio species. We identified important aquaculture pathogens Vibrio rotiferianus and Vibrio jasicida from these sites that have not been reported in UK waters. We also isolated human pathogenic Vibrio species including V. parahaemolyticus from these sites. This paper reports the first isolation of V. rotiferianus and V. jasicida from UK shellfish and highlights a growing diversity of Vibrio species inhabiting British waters.

Original languageEnglish
Article number117942
Number of pages12
JournalWater Research
Volume211
Early online date8 Dec 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2022

Keywords

  • Vibrio species
  • Vibrio jasicida
  • Vibrio rotiferianus
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus
  • shellfish
  • sea-surface temperature
  • UKRI
  • BBSRC
  • BB/N016513/1

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