The invasive gastropod Crepidula fornicata: reproduction and recruitment in the intertidal at its northernmost range in Wales, UK, and implications for its secondary spread

Katrin Bohn*, Christopher Richardson, Stuart Jenkins

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The establishment and spread of a non-native species in an introduced range depends to a large extent on the performance of the species under the prevailing environmental conditions. The spawning, larval and spatfall periods of the invasive gastropod Crepidula fornicata were monitored in the intertidal zone at its northernmost range in Wales, UK, between February 2010 and January 2011. The duration of the reproductive season was similar to that recorded from more southerly European populations. Spawning and larval release occurred throughout most of the year even at low seawater temperatures of 16 °C. Recruitment was low and likely controlled by post-settlement mortality. These observations suggest that C. fornicata's northwards spread in Welsh waters will not be limited by seawater temperature negatively affecting reproduction, but by processes acting after larval release. These data show the importance of incorporating settlement and post-settlement processes into studies on recruitment success when aiming to predict the potential spread of a potentially harmful invader such as C. fornicata.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2091-2103
Number of pages13
JournalMarine Biology
Volume159
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The invasive gastropod Crepidula fornicata: reproduction and recruitment in the intertidal at its northernmost range in Wales, UK, and implications for its secondary spread'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this