The United Nations and counter-terrorism after September 11: towards an assessment of the impact and prospects of counter-terror 'spill-over' into international criminal justice cooperation

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

73 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The paper focuses on the recent role of the United Nations (UN) after the attacks of 11 September 2001 in improving the effectiveness and commitment of states to counterterrorism through the development of domestic legislation, policy and practice. The post- Cold War context provided a facilitative environment for the UN Security Council enabling ad hoc or case-by-case responses to acts of terrorism during the 1990s. However, the paper argues that the intervention of the Security Council in the aftermath of 9/11 has proved to be a decisive break-point to a comprehensive regime that binds states to international legal norms against acts of terrorism and increases the obligations to undertake executive action against all forms of terrorism. Realisation is contingent on a substantive improvement to international criminal justice cooperation in general, raising the prospect of spill over
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages20
Publication statusPublished - 2004
EventBritish Society of Criminology Conference - University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom
Duration: 6 Jul 20049 Jul 2004

Conference

ConferenceBritish Society of Criminology Conference
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityUniversity of Portsmouth
Period6/07/049/07/04

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The United Nations and counter-terrorism after September 11: towards an assessment of the impact and prospects of counter-terror 'spill-over' into international criminal justice cooperation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this