The use of ground models for the integration of geomorphological, geoenvironmental and engineering geological data

Dave Giles

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterpeer-review

    Abstract

    The use of conceptual ground models (CGM) together with conceptual site models (CSM) is becoming an increasingly important tool for the characterisation and interpretation of engineering sites and in particular as part of the investigation and redevelopment of potentially contaminated Brownfield sites. The key data sets of geomorphology, solid and superficial geology, hydrogeology and site history which are necessary for the investigation, interpretation and risk management of a particular site can be complex to present together. The use of a visualised ground model allows for a clear interpretation of these data to be made in a format that is readily accessible by an end user.
    A visualised ground model provides the geomorphologist and engineering geologist with a simple and easily understood vehicle to aid in the understanding of the three and often four dimensional variability of a given site. Complex interactions and potential geohazards, whether geomorphological or geological, can be identified and emphasised by the use of such models.
    This paper will review the current approaches to ground model design and will highlight the need for geomorphological data to be integrated within them. Various examples will be presented of the different approaches that are available, particularly with regard to contaminated former Brownfield sites.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages82
    Publication statusPublished - 2013
    Event8th IAG International Conference on Geomorphology - Paris, United Kingdom
    Duration: 27 Aug 201331 Aug 2013

    Conference

    Conference8th IAG International Conference on Geomorphology
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityParis
    Period27/08/1331/08/13

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