Thriving

Daniel J. Brown, Michael John Richard Passaportis, Kate Hays

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

Sport performers are known to experience a wide range of stressors during their careers. Moreover, the context created by these demands has been shown to have an impact on the performance and well-being of the individuals. For example, a scourge of recent media allegations and the publication of Dame Tanni-Grey Thompson’s Duty of Care report highlighted that British elite sport organizations have often neglected the detrimental impact of their performance-focussed environments on the mental health and well-being of their performers. This observation contrasts with academic literature, where scholars have long sought to understand and promote both performance and well-being. Within this work, performance and well-being have typically been considered as distinct outcomes; however, researchers have recently described how concurrently perceiving a high-level of performance and experiencing a high-level well-being is indicative of thriving in sport performers. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss contemporary thriving research in sport and to offer the latest insight into how these desirable outcomes can be co-facilitated. Specifically, this chapter will introduce the notion of human thriving, review sport-based literature on the construct, explore how thriving can be promoted in sport performers, and offer suggestions for future research in the area.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStress, Well-Being, and Performance in Sport
EditorsRachel Arnold, David Fletcher
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter13
Pages297-312
Number of pages16
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9780429295874
ISBN (Print)9780367272678
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Mar 2021

Publication series

NameRoutledge Psychology of Sport, Exercise and Physical Activity
PublisherRoutledge

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