Understanding evolution and the complexity of species interactions using orchids as a model system

Judith L. Bronstein, W. Scott Armbruster, John N. Thompson

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Abstract

Orchids have been a subject of fascination for biologists for a few hundred years, and to humankind no doubt much longer. By the time Charles Darwin wrote his volume on orchids in 1862, many of the mysteries surrounding these plants, including the origins and functions of their spectacularly diverse and complex floral forms, were already well-articulated. The 31st New Phytologist Symposium explored some of the most intriguing new questions about orchid biology. Entitled ‘Orchid symbioses: models for evolutionary ecology’ and held at the University of Calabria (Rende, Italy) in May 2013, this symposium focused on two sets of interactions upon which orchids critically depend: those with pollinators and those with mycorrhizal fungi.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-375
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume202
Issue number2
Early online date20 Mar 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014
Event31st New Phytologist Symposium, ‘Orchid symbioses: models for evolutionary ecology' - University of Calabria, Rende, Italy
Duration: 14 May 201316 May 2013

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