Using the model statement to elicit information and cues to deceit from native speakers, non-native speakers and those talking through an interpreter

Sarah Ewens, Aldert Vrij, Sharon Leal, Samantha Mann, Eunkyung Jo, Alla Shaboltas, Maria Ivanova, Juliana Granskaya, Kate Houston

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Abstract

We examined how the presence of an interpreter during an interview affects eliciting information and cues to deceit, whilst using a method that encourages interviewees to provide more detail (model statement, MS). Sixty native English speakers were interviewed in English, and 186 non-native English speakers were interviewed in English or through an interpreter. Interviewees either lied or told the truth about a mock security meeting, which they reported twice: in an initial free recall and after listening to the MS. The MS resulted in the native English speakers and those interviewed with an interpreter providing more reminiscences (additional detail) than the non-native English speakers interviewed without an interpreter. As a result, those interviewed through an interpreter provided more detail than the non-native English speakers, but only after the MS. Native English participants were most detailed in both recalls. No difference was found in the amount of reminiscences provided by liars and truth tellers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)854-862
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume30
Issue number6
Early online date21 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2016

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