Weathering of coastal defensive structures in southwest England: a 500 year stone durability trial

Derek Mottershead

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Historic structures can be viewed as exposure trials of the stone of which they are constructed. As such, they represent a geomorphological weathering experiment. Several structures of Henrician (sixteenth century) and greater age on the coast of southwest England have been exposed to coastal salt weathering for 500–600 years. Long-term weathering rates on five different rock groups are derived from careful study of weathering depths and forms. There is significant variation in weathering rate between five major rock groups. Rank ordering of weathering rate values reveals a durability order of these rock groups, which is confirmed by local juxtapositions. Controls on rock durability in the coastal weathering environment include both mechanical and mineralogical characteristics. Specific density, and combined quartz and muscovite content, are positively related to durability; high feldspar and chlorite content are associated with low durability. Copyright © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1143-1159
    Number of pages17
    JournalEarth Surface Processes and Landforms
    Volume25
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2000

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