Work–family conflict and self-rated health: the role of gender and educational level. Baseline data from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)

Rosane Härter Griep, Susanna Toivanen, Cornelia Van Diepen, Joanna M. N. Guimarães, Lidyane V. Camelo, Leidjaira Lopes Juvanhol, Estela M. Aquino, Dóra Chor

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    Abstract

    Purpose
    This study examined gender differences in the association between work–family conflict and self-rated health and evaluated the effect of educational attainment.

    Method
    We used baseline data from ELSA-Brasil, a cohort study of civil servants from six Brazilian state capitals. Our samples included 12,017 active workers aged 34–72 years. Work–family conflict was measured by four indicators measuring effects of work on family, effects of family in work and lack of time for leisure and personal care.

    Results
    Women experienced more frequent work–family conflict, but in both genders, increased work–family conflict directly correlated with poorer self-rated health. Women’s educational level interacted with three work–family conflict indicators. For time-based effects of work on family, highly educated women had higher odds of suboptimal self-rated health (OR = 1.54; 95 % CI = 1.19–1.99) than less educated women (OR = 1.14; 95 % CI = 0.92–1.42). For strain-based effects of work on family, women with higher and lower education levels had OR = 1.91 (95 % CI 1.48–2.47) and OR = 1.40 (95 % CI 1.12–1.75), respectively. For lack of time for leisure and personal care, women with higher and lower education levels had OR = 2.60 (95 % CI = 1.95–3.47) and OR = 1.11 (95 % CI = 0.90–1.38), respectively.

    Conclusion
    Women’s education level affects the relationship between work–family conflict and self-rated health. The results may contribute to prevention activities.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)372-382
    JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
    Volume23
    Issue number3
    Early online date23 Nov 2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2016

    Keywords

    • Gender
    • Work and family conflict
    • Self-rated health
    • Educational level
    • ELSA-Brasil cohort study

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