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A Democratic Licence to Operate: Report of the Independent Surveillance Review

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

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A Democratic Licence to Operate : Report of the Independent Surveillance Review. / Grieve, John; Clarke, Michael; Brook, Heather; Cowley, Lesley; Evans, Jonathan; Lane Fox, Martha; Hall, Wendy; Hennessy, Peter; Ormand, David; O'Neill, Onora; Rooker, Jeffrey; Scarlett, John; Walden, Ian.

Royal United Services Institute, 2015. 154 p.

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Harvard

Grieve, J, Clarke, M, Brook, H, Cowley, L, Evans, J, Lane Fox, M, Hall, W, Hennessy, P, Ormand, D, O'Neill, O, Rooker, J, Scarlett, J & Walden, I 2015, A Democratic Licence to Operate: Report of the Independent Surveillance Review. Royal United Services Institute. <https://rusi.org/publication/whitehall-reports/democratic-licence-operate-report-independent-surveillance-review>

APA

Grieve, J., Clarke, M., Brook, H., Cowley, L., Evans, J., Lane Fox, M., Hall, W., Hennessy, P., Ormand, D., O'Neill, O., Rooker, J., Scarlett, J., & Walden, I. (2015). A Democratic Licence to Operate: Report of the Independent Surveillance Review. Royal United Services Institute. https://rusi.org/publication/whitehall-reports/democratic-licence-operate-report-independent-surveillance-review

Vancouver

Grieve J, Clarke M, Brook H, Cowley L, Evans J, Lane Fox M et al. A Democratic Licence to Operate: Report of the Independent Surveillance Review. Royal United Services Institute, 2015. 154 p.

Author

Grieve, John ; Clarke, Michael ; Brook, Heather ; Cowley, Lesley ; Evans, Jonathan ; Lane Fox, Martha ; Hall, Wendy ; Hennessy, Peter ; Ormand, David ; O'Neill, Onora ; Rooker, Jeffrey ; Scarlett, John ; Walden, Ian. / A Democratic Licence to Operate : Report of the Independent Surveillance Review. Royal United Services Institute, 2015. 154 p.

Bibtex

@book{e9d28ee3d9e94f359bd330a28a188d41,
title = "A Democratic Licence to Operate: Report of the Independent Surveillance Review",
abstract = "As national security and public safety compete with the realities of digital society, the Independent Surveillance Review suggests a new licence to operate for the security and law-enforcement services. The British population has been greatly affected by the rapid evolution in information and communications technology. In this digital society, we all leave extensive traces of our behaviour and interactions in the course of our normal, everyday lives. We have unprecedented opportunities to express ourselves, to connect and share knowledge, to be prosperous and inventive.At the same time, the digital society also presents new challenges, making citizens potential targets for fraudsters, criminals and possibly terrorists. The task for the police and SIAs has become more demanding as they try to stay abreast of rapid technological innovation and deal with threats that emanate from across the globe. It is important to ensure that the powers granted to these agencies to protect the public are explicit, comprehensible, and are seen to be both lawful and consistent with democratic values.The citizen{\textquoteright}s right to privacy online as offline – and what constitutes a {\textquoteleft}justifiable{\textquoteright} level of intrusion by the state – has become a central topic of debate. As traditional notions of national security and public safety compete with the realities of digital society, it is necessary to periodically renew the licence of the police, security and intelligence agencies to operate. This report aims to enable the public at large to engage in a more informed way in the debate, so that a broad consensus can be achieved and a new, democratic licence to operate can be agreed.",
author = "John Grieve and Michael Clarke and Heather Brook and Lesley Cowley and Jonathan Evans and {Lane Fox}, Martha and Wendy Hall and Peter Hennessy and David Ormand and Onora O'Neill and Jeffrey Rooker and John Scarlett and Ian Walden",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
publisher = "Royal United Services Institute",

}

RIS

TY - BOOK

T1 - A Democratic Licence to Operate

T2 - Report of the Independent Surveillance Review

AU - Grieve, John

AU - Clarke, Michael

AU - Brook, Heather

AU - Cowley, Lesley

AU - Evans, Jonathan

AU - Lane Fox, Martha

AU - Hall, Wendy

AU - Hennessy, Peter

AU - Ormand, David

AU - O'Neill, Onora

AU - Rooker, Jeffrey

AU - Scarlett, John

AU - Walden, Ian

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - As national security and public safety compete with the realities of digital society, the Independent Surveillance Review suggests a new licence to operate for the security and law-enforcement services. The British population has been greatly affected by the rapid evolution in information and communications technology. In this digital society, we all leave extensive traces of our behaviour and interactions in the course of our normal, everyday lives. We have unprecedented opportunities to express ourselves, to connect and share knowledge, to be prosperous and inventive.At the same time, the digital society also presents new challenges, making citizens potential targets for fraudsters, criminals and possibly terrorists. The task for the police and SIAs has become more demanding as they try to stay abreast of rapid technological innovation and deal with threats that emanate from across the globe. It is important to ensure that the powers granted to these agencies to protect the public are explicit, comprehensible, and are seen to be both lawful and consistent with democratic values.The citizen’s right to privacy online as offline – and what constitutes a ‘justifiable’ level of intrusion by the state – has become a central topic of debate. As traditional notions of national security and public safety compete with the realities of digital society, it is necessary to periodically renew the licence of the police, security and intelligence agencies to operate. This report aims to enable the public at large to engage in a more informed way in the debate, so that a broad consensus can be achieved and a new, democratic licence to operate can be agreed.

AB - As national security and public safety compete with the realities of digital society, the Independent Surveillance Review suggests a new licence to operate for the security and law-enforcement services. The British population has been greatly affected by the rapid evolution in information and communications technology. In this digital society, we all leave extensive traces of our behaviour and interactions in the course of our normal, everyday lives. We have unprecedented opportunities to express ourselves, to connect and share knowledge, to be prosperous and inventive.At the same time, the digital society also presents new challenges, making citizens potential targets for fraudsters, criminals and possibly terrorists. The task for the police and SIAs has become more demanding as they try to stay abreast of rapid technological innovation and deal with threats that emanate from across the globe. It is important to ensure that the powers granted to these agencies to protect the public are explicit, comprehensible, and are seen to be both lawful and consistent with democratic values.The citizen’s right to privacy online as offline – and what constitutes a ‘justifiable’ level of intrusion by the state – has become a central topic of debate. As traditional notions of national security and public safety compete with the realities of digital society, it is necessary to periodically renew the licence of the police, security and intelligence agencies to operate. This report aims to enable the public at large to engage in a more informed way in the debate, so that a broad consensus can be achieved and a new, democratic licence to operate can be agreed.

M3 - Commissioned report

BT - A Democratic Licence to Operate

PB - Royal United Services Institute

ER -

ID: 8137981