Skip to content
Back to outputs

A multistudy examination of organizational stressors, emotional labor, burnout, and turnover in sport organizations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

A multistudy examination of organizational stressors, emotional labor, burnout, and turnover in sport organizations. / Larner, R. J.; Wagstaff, C. R. D.; Thelwell, R. C.; Corbett, J.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, Vol. 27, No. 12, 01.12.2017, p. 2103-2115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Larner, R. J. ; Wagstaff, C. R. D. ; Thelwell, R. C. ; Corbett, J. / A multistudy examination of organizational stressors, emotional labor, burnout, and turnover in sport organizations. In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports. 2017 ; Vol. 27, No. 12. pp. 2103-2115.

Bibtex

@article{1dfd9c96c60f49c6a21be3b79b3a6021,
title = "A multistudy examination of organizational stressors, emotional labor, burnout, and turnover in sport organizations",
abstract = "While a growing body of research has examined the types of organizational stressors encountered by individuals and their allied responses, little is known about how such individuals manage their emotional responses to these stressors or the consequences of such behaviors. This article presents novel findings from two studies examining the moderating role that emotional labor plays in the relationship between the frequency of organizational stressor experience, burnout, turnover intentions, and actual turnover in sport. In study 1, participants (n=487) completed measures of organizational stressors (OSI-SP), emotional labor (ELS), burnout (ABQ), and turnover intentions. In study 2, a 6-month longitudinal design was used to examine measures of organizational stressors (OSI-SP), emotional labor (ELS), turnover intentions, and actual turnover. Study 1 showed that surface acting moderated the relationship between the frequency of organizational stressors and burnout in sport. Further, surface acting acted as an important mechanism through which burnout mediated the relationship between the frequency of organizational stressors and turnover intentions. Study 2 showed that surface acting moderated the relationship between the organizational stressor frequency and turnover intentions—but not actual turnover—over time. These results highlight the importance of surface acting in understanding how individuals respond to organizational stressors encountered in sport, expanding our understanding of the positive and negative responses component of the meta-model of stress, emotions, and performance. These findings also highlight potentially deleterious emotion-management behaviors that practitioners might consider when aiming to support individuals encountering organizational stressors in sport.",
keywords = "longitudinal, stress, surface acting, well-being, dropout, emotion regulation",
author = "Larner, {R. J.} and Wagstaff, {C. R. D.} and Thelwell, {R. C.} and J. Corbett",
year = "2017",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/sms.12833",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "2103--2115",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports",
issn = "0905-7188",
publisher = "Blackwell Munksgaard",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A multistudy examination of organizational stressors, emotional labor, burnout, and turnover in sport organizations

AU - Larner, R. J.

AU - Wagstaff, C. R. D.

AU - Thelwell, R. C.

AU - Corbett, J.

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - While a growing body of research has examined the types of organizational stressors encountered by individuals and their allied responses, little is known about how such individuals manage their emotional responses to these stressors or the consequences of such behaviors. This article presents novel findings from two studies examining the moderating role that emotional labor plays in the relationship between the frequency of organizational stressor experience, burnout, turnover intentions, and actual turnover in sport. In study 1, participants (n=487) completed measures of organizational stressors (OSI-SP), emotional labor (ELS), burnout (ABQ), and turnover intentions. In study 2, a 6-month longitudinal design was used to examine measures of organizational stressors (OSI-SP), emotional labor (ELS), turnover intentions, and actual turnover. Study 1 showed that surface acting moderated the relationship between the frequency of organizational stressors and burnout in sport. Further, surface acting acted as an important mechanism through which burnout mediated the relationship between the frequency of organizational stressors and turnover intentions. Study 2 showed that surface acting moderated the relationship between the organizational stressor frequency and turnover intentions—but not actual turnover—over time. These results highlight the importance of surface acting in understanding how individuals respond to organizational stressors encountered in sport, expanding our understanding of the positive and negative responses component of the meta-model of stress, emotions, and performance. These findings also highlight potentially deleterious emotion-management behaviors that practitioners might consider when aiming to support individuals encountering organizational stressors in sport.

AB - While a growing body of research has examined the types of organizational stressors encountered by individuals and their allied responses, little is known about how such individuals manage their emotional responses to these stressors or the consequences of such behaviors. This article presents novel findings from two studies examining the moderating role that emotional labor plays in the relationship between the frequency of organizational stressor experience, burnout, turnover intentions, and actual turnover in sport. In study 1, participants (n=487) completed measures of organizational stressors (OSI-SP), emotional labor (ELS), burnout (ABQ), and turnover intentions. In study 2, a 6-month longitudinal design was used to examine measures of organizational stressors (OSI-SP), emotional labor (ELS), turnover intentions, and actual turnover. Study 1 showed that surface acting moderated the relationship between the frequency of organizational stressors and burnout in sport. Further, surface acting acted as an important mechanism through which burnout mediated the relationship between the frequency of organizational stressors and turnover intentions. Study 2 showed that surface acting moderated the relationship between the organizational stressor frequency and turnover intentions—but not actual turnover—over time. These results highlight the importance of surface acting in understanding how individuals respond to organizational stressors encountered in sport, expanding our understanding of the positive and negative responses component of the meta-model of stress, emotions, and performance. These findings also highlight potentially deleterious emotion-management behaviors that practitioners might consider when aiming to support individuals encountering organizational stressors in sport.

KW - longitudinal

KW - stress

KW - surface acting

KW - well-being

KW - dropout

KW - emotion regulation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85014597622&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/sms.12833

DO - 10.1111/sms.12833

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 2103

EP - 2115

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports

SN - 0905-7188

IS - 12

ER -

ID: 6696297