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Abnormal repetitive behaviors in zebrafish and their relevance to human brain disorders

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Abnormal repetitive behaviors in zebrafish and their relevance to human brain disorders. / Zabegalov, Konstantin N.; Khatsko, Sergey L.; Lakstygal, Anton M.; Demin, Konstantin A.; Cleal, Madeleine; Fontana, Barbara D.; McBride, Sebastian D.; Harvey, Brian H.; De Abreu, Murilo S.; Parker, Matthew O.; Kalueff, Allan V.

In: Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 367, 23.07.2019, p. 101-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Zabegalov, KN, Khatsko, SL, Lakstygal, AM, Demin, KA, Cleal, M, Fontana, BD, McBride, SD, Harvey, BH, De Abreu, MS, Parker, MO & Kalueff, AV 2019, 'Abnormal repetitive behaviors in zebrafish and their relevance to human brain disorders', Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 367, pp. 101-110. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2019.03.044

APA

Zabegalov, K. N., Khatsko, S. L., Lakstygal, A. M., Demin, K. A., Cleal, M., Fontana, B. D., ... Kalueff, A. V. (2019). Abnormal repetitive behaviors in zebrafish and their relevance to human brain disorders. Behavioural Brain Research, 367, 101-110. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2019.03.044

Vancouver

Zabegalov KN, Khatsko SL, Lakstygal AM, Demin KA, Cleal M, Fontana BD et al. Abnormal repetitive behaviors in zebrafish and their relevance to human brain disorders. Behavioural Brain Research. 2019 Jul 23;367:101-110. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2019.03.044

Author

Zabegalov, Konstantin N. ; Khatsko, Sergey L. ; Lakstygal, Anton M. ; Demin, Konstantin A. ; Cleal, Madeleine ; Fontana, Barbara D. ; McBride, Sebastian D. ; Harvey, Brian H. ; De Abreu, Murilo S. ; Parker, Matthew O. ; Kalueff, Allan V. / Abnormal repetitive behaviors in zebrafish and their relevance to human brain disorders. In: Behavioural Brain Research. 2019 ; Vol. 367. pp. 101-110.

Bibtex

@article{9fee0789f606479a88f1f09a0bb82091,
title = "Abnormal repetitive behaviors in zebrafish and their relevance to human brain disorders",
abstract = "Abnormal repetitive behaviors (ARBs) are a prominent symptom of numerous human brain disorders and are commonly seen in rodent models as well. While rodent studies of ARBs continue to dominate the field, mounting evidence suggests that zebrafish (Danio rerio) also display ARB-like phenotypes and may therefore be a novel model organism for ARB research. In addition to clear practical research advantages as a model species, zebrafish share high genetic and physiological homology to humans and rodents, including multiple ARB-related genes and robust behaviors relevant to ARB. Here, we discuss a wide spectrum of stereotypic repetitive behaviors in zebrafish, data on their genetic and pharmacological modulation, and the overall translational relevance of fish ARBs to modeling human brain disorders. Overall, the zebrafish is rapidly emerging as a new promising model to study ARBs and their underlying mechanisms.",
keywords = "zebrafish, abnormal repetitive behavior, stereotypy, animal models, human brain disorders",
author = "Zabegalov, {Konstantin N.} and Khatsko, {Sergey L.} and Lakstygal, {Anton M.} and Demin, {Konstantin A.} and Madeleine Cleal and Fontana, {Barbara D.} and McBride, {Sebastian D.} and Harvey, {Brian H.} and {De Abreu}, {Murilo S.} and Parker, {Matthew O.} and Kalueff, {Allan V.}",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "23",
doi = "10.1016/j.bbr.2019.03.044",
language = "English",
volume = "367",
pages = "101--110",
journal = "Behavioural Brain Research",
issn = "0166-4328",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Abnormal repetitive behaviors in zebrafish and their relevance to human brain disorders

AU - Zabegalov, Konstantin N.

AU - Khatsko, Sergey L.

AU - Lakstygal, Anton M.

AU - Demin, Konstantin A.

AU - Cleal, Madeleine

AU - Fontana, Barbara D.

AU - McBride, Sebastian D.

AU - Harvey, Brian H.

AU - De Abreu, Murilo S.

AU - Parker, Matthew O.

AU - Kalueff, Allan V.

PY - 2019/7/23

Y1 - 2019/7/23

N2 - Abnormal repetitive behaviors (ARBs) are a prominent symptom of numerous human brain disorders and are commonly seen in rodent models as well. While rodent studies of ARBs continue to dominate the field, mounting evidence suggests that zebrafish (Danio rerio) also display ARB-like phenotypes and may therefore be a novel model organism for ARB research. In addition to clear practical research advantages as a model species, zebrafish share high genetic and physiological homology to humans and rodents, including multiple ARB-related genes and robust behaviors relevant to ARB. Here, we discuss a wide spectrum of stereotypic repetitive behaviors in zebrafish, data on their genetic and pharmacological modulation, and the overall translational relevance of fish ARBs to modeling human brain disorders. Overall, the zebrafish is rapidly emerging as a new promising model to study ARBs and their underlying mechanisms.

AB - Abnormal repetitive behaviors (ARBs) are a prominent symptom of numerous human brain disorders and are commonly seen in rodent models as well. While rodent studies of ARBs continue to dominate the field, mounting evidence suggests that zebrafish (Danio rerio) also display ARB-like phenotypes and may therefore be a novel model organism for ARB research. In addition to clear practical research advantages as a model species, zebrafish share high genetic and physiological homology to humans and rodents, including multiple ARB-related genes and robust behaviors relevant to ARB. Here, we discuss a wide spectrum of stereotypic repetitive behaviors in zebrafish, data on their genetic and pharmacological modulation, and the overall translational relevance of fish ARBs to modeling human brain disorders. Overall, the zebrafish is rapidly emerging as a new promising model to study ARBs and their underlying mechanisms.

KW - zebrafish

KW - abnormal repetitive behavior

KW - stereotypy

KW - animal models

KW - human brain disorders

U2 - 10.1016/j.bbr.2019.03.044

DO - 10.1016/j.bbr.2019.03.044

M3 - Article

VL - 367

SP - 101

EP - 110

JO - Behavioural Brain Research

JF - Behavioural Brain Research

SN - 0166-4328

ER -

ID: 13818864