Skip to content
Back to outputs

Adverse effects of anxiety on attentional control differ as a function of experience: A simulated driving study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Adverse effects of anxiety on attentional control differ as a function of experience: A simulated driving study. / Gotardi, Gisele C.; Polastri, Paula F.; Schor, Paulo; Oudejans, Raôul R.D.; van der Kamp, John; Savelsbergh, Geert J.P.; Navarro, Martina; Rodrigues, Sérgio T.

In: Applied Ergonomics, Vol. 74, 01.01.2019, p. 41-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Gotardi, GC, Polastri, PF, Schor, P, Oudejans, RRD, van der Kamp, J, Savelsbergh, GJP, Navarro, M & Rodrigues, ST 2019, 'Adverse effects of anxiety on attentional control differ as a function of experience: A simulated driving study', Applied Ergonomics, vol. 74, pp. 41-47. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2018.08.009

APA

Gotardi, G. C., Polastri, P. F., Schor, P., Oudejans, R. R. D., van der Kamp, J., Savelsbergh, G. J. P., ... Rodrigues, S. T. (2019). Adverse effects of anxiety on attentional control differ as a function of experience: A simulated driving study. Applied Ergonomics, 74, 41-47. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2018.08.009

Vancouver

Gotardi GC, Polastri PF, Schor P, Oudejans RRD, van der Kamp J, Savelsbergh GJP et al. Adverse effects of anxiety on attentional control differ as a function of experience: A simulated driving study. Applied Ergonomics. 2019 Jan 1;74:41-47. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2018.08.009

Author

Gotardi, Gisele C. ; Polastri, Paula F. ; Schor, Paulo ; Oudejans, Raôul R.D. ; van der Kamp, John ; Savelsbergh, Geert J.P. ; Navarro, Martina ; Rodrigues, Sérgio T. / Adverse effects of anxiety on attentional control differ as a function of experience: A simulated driving study. In: Applied Ergonomics. 2019 ; Vol. 74. pp. 41-47.

Bibtex

@article{a4989009441c406d931f16cb3133e10c,
title = "Adverse effects of anxiety on attentional control differ as a function of experience: A simulated driving study",
abstract = "This study tested whether adverse effects of state anxiety on attention and performance may be modulated by experience. Sixteen experienced and eleven inexperienced drivers drove in a simulator under low- and high-stress conditions. Anxiety was manipulated by competition, the presence of an evaluator, external video camera, and traffic noise. Most drivers showed greater anxiety scores and higher mean heart rates following manipulation. In both groups increased state anxiety decreased car speed control and caused more collisions, accompanied by fewer fixations of longer duration towards the driving lane across a horizontally narrower region. Inexperienced drivers increased the number of short fixations towards cars, while experienced drivers increased the number of short fixations on the speedometer. Although anxiety impairs processing efficiency and performance effectiveness for both groups, attentional changes differ as a function of experience. Inexperienced drivers tended to shift attention to threatening stimuli, while experienced drives were more likely to consciously monitor task goal.",
keywords = "Anxiety, Attentional control theory, Driving experience, Gaze",
author = "Gotardi, {Gisele C.} and Polastri, {Paula F.} and Paulo Schor and Oudejans, {Ra{\^o}ul R.D.} and {van der Kamp}, John and Savelsbergh, {Geert J.P.} and Martina Navarro and Rodrigues, {S{\'e}rgio T.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.apergo.2018.08.009",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "41--47",
journal = "Applied Ergonomics",
issn = "0003-6870",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adverse effects of anxiety on attentional control differ as a function of experience: A simulated driving study

AU - Gotardi, Gisele C.

AU - Polastri, Paula F.

AU - Schor, Paulo

AU - Oudejans, Raôul R.D.

AU - van der Kamp, John

AU - Savelsbergh, Geert J.P.

AU - Navarro, Martina

AU - Rodrigues, Sérgio T.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - This study tested whether adverse effects of state anxiety on attention and performance may be modulated by experience. Sixteen experienced and eleven inexperienced drivers drove in a simulator under low- and high-stress conditions. Anxiety was manipulated by competition, the presence of an evaluator, external video camera, and traffic noise. Most drivers showed greater anxiety scores and higher mean heart rates following manipulation. In both groups increased state anxiety decreased car speed control and caused more collisions, accompanied by fewer fixations of longer duration towards the driving lane across a horizontally narrower region. Inexperienced drivers increased the number of short fixations towards cars, while experienced drivers increased the number of short fixations on the speedometer. Although anxiety impairs processing efficiency and performance effectiveness for both groups, attentional changes differ as a function of experience. Inexperienced drivers tended to shift attention to threatening stimuli, while experienced drives were more likely to consciously monitor task goal.

AB - This study tested whether adverse effects of state anxiety on attention and performance may be modulated by experience. Sixteen experienced and eleven inexperienced drivers drove in a simulator under low- and high-stress conditions. Anxiety was manipulated by competition, the presence of an evaluator, external video camera, and traffic noise. Most drivers showed greater anxiety scores and higher mean heart rates following manipulation. In both groups increased state anxiety decreased car speed control and caused more collisions, accompanied by fewer fixations of longer duration towards the driving lane across a horizontally narrower region. Inexperienced drivers increased the number of short fixations towards cars, while experienced drivers increased the number of short fixations on the speedometer. Although anxiety impairs processing efficiency and performance effectiveness for both groups, attentional changes differ as a function of experience. Inexperienced drivers tended to shift attention to threatening stimuli, while experienced drives were more likely to consciously monitor task goal.

KW - Anxiety

KW - Attentional control theory

KW - Driving experience

KW - Gaze

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85051377053&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.apergo.2018.08.009

DO - 10.1016/j.apergo.2018.08.009

M3 - Article

VL - 74

SP - 41

EP - 47

JO - Applied Ergonomics

JF - Applied Ergonomics

SN - 0003-6870

ER -

ID: 11294981