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Asking ‘What about’ questions in chronic illness self-management meetings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Asking ‘What about’ questions in chronic illness self-management meetings. / Fasulo, Alessandra; Zinken, Jörg; Zinken, Katarzyna.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 99, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 917-925.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Fasulo, A, Zinken, J & Zinken, K 2016, 'Asking ‘What about’ questions in chronic illness self-management meetings', Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 99, no. 6, pp. 917-925. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2016.03.009

APA

Fasulo, A., Zinken, J., & Zinken, K. (2016). Asking ‘What about’ questions in chronic illness self-management meetings. Patient Education and Counseling, 99(6), 917-925. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2016.03.009

Vancouver

Fasulo A, Zinken J, Zinken K. Asking ‘What about’ questions in chronic illness self-management meetings. Patient Education and Counseling. 2016 Jun 1;99(6):917-925. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2016.03.009

Author

Fasulo, Alessandra ; Zinken, Jörg ; Zinken, Katarzyna. / Asking ‘What about’ questions in chronic illness self-management meetings. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2016 ; Vol. 99, No. 6. pp. 917-925.

Bibtex

@article{cd867aa50f494fcc9d64894bc5f9661f,
title = "Asking {\textquoteleft}What about{\textquoteright} questions in chronic illness self-management meetings",
abstract = "Objectives - This study investigates {\textquoteleft}What about{\textquoteright} questions asked by patients in the course of diabetes self-management groups led by nurses, and explores their functions in these empowerment-informed settings.Methods - Conversation Analysis of 24 video-recorded sessions of a Start Insulin Group Programme for patients with type 2 diabetes, in a diabetes centre in the South of England. The groups included 2–7 patients and were led by 5 nurses, all of whom had received training in the empowerment approach.Results - The analysis revealed a prevalence of single-unit {\textquoteleft}Whatabout X{\textquoteright} questions and found that they were used to embed requests for information in current or just closed activities. The nurses always provided the information, but could ask patients to specify the content of the question and collaborate to the answer.Conclusion - The analysis suggests that the short form of the question may be adapting to the nurses{\textquoteright} restraint in giving recommendations or immediate responses to information seeking-questions.Practice implications - When healthcare communication practices are shaped in observance to a theoretical approach, such as empowerment, it is recommendable that practitioners monitor not only what they do, but also how patients change their habitual forms of speech in response.",
keywords = "Nurse-patient communication, What-about questions, Conversation analysis, Empowerment, Epistemics",
author = "Alessandra Fasulo and J{\"o}rg Zinken and Katarzyna Zinken",
year = "2016",
month = jun,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.pec.2016.03.009",
language = "English",
volume = "99",
pages = "917--925",
journal = "Patient Education and Counseling",
issn = "0738-3991",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Asking ‘What about’ questions in chronic illness self-management meetings

AU - Fasulo, Alessandra

AU - Zinken, Jörg

AU - Zinken, Katarzyna

PY - 2016/6/1

Y1 - 2016/6/1

N2 - Objectives - This study investigates ‘What about’ questions asked by patients in the course of diabetes self-management groups led by nurses, and explores their functions in these empowerment-informed settings.Methods - Conversation Analysis of 24 video-recorded sessions of a Start Insulin Group Programme for patients with type 2 diabetes, in a diabetes centre in the South of England. The groups included 2–7 patients and were led by 5 nurses, all of whom had received training in the empowerment approach.Results - The analysis revealed a prevalence of single-unit ‘Whatabout X’ questions and found that they were used to embed requests for information in current or just closed activities. The nurses always provided the information, but could ask patients to specify the content of the question and collaborate to the answer.Conclusion - The analysis suggests that the short form of the question may be adapting to the nurses’ restraint in giving recommendations or immediate responses to information seeking-questions.Practice implications - When healthcare communication practices are shaped in observance to a theoretical approach, such as empowerment, it is recommendable that practitioners monitor not only what they do, but also how patients change their habitual forms of speech in response.

AB - Objectives - This study investigates ‘What about’ questions asked by patients in the course of diabetes self-management groups led by nurses, and explores their functions in these empowerment-informed settings.Methods - Conversation Analysis of 24 video-recorded sessions of a Start Insulin Group Programme for patients with type 2 diabetes, in a diabetes centre in the South of England. The groups included 2–7 patients and were led by 5 nurses, all of whom had received training in the empowerment approach.Results - The analysis revealed a prevalence of single-unit ‘Whatabout X’ questions and found that they were used to embed requests for information in current or just closed activities. The nurses always provided the information, but could ask patients to specify the content of the question and collaborate to the answer.Conclusion - The analysis suggests that the short form of the question may be adapting to the nurses’ restraint in giving recommendations or immediate responses to information seeking-questions.Practice implications - When healthcare communication practices are shaped in observance to a theoretical approach, such as empowerment, it is recommendable that practitioners monitor not only what they do, but also how patients change their habitual forms of speech in response.

KW - Nurse-patient communication

KW - What-about questions

KW - Conversation analysis

KW - Empowerment

KW - Epistemics

U2 - 10.1016/j.pec.2016.03.009

DO - 10.1016/j.pec.2016.03.009

M3 - Article

VL - 99

SP - 917

EP - 925

JO - Patient Education and Counseling

JF - Patient Education and Counseling

SN - 0738-3991

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 4116516