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Association between Intervention Delivery Approach for Postnatal Depression and its Subsequent Adherence

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Background: Recent research on providing support for women with postnatal depression indicates that many women poorly comply with treatment or show only moderate improvement in depression. This paper reviews evidence on the association between intervention delivery approach for postnatal depression and its subsequent adherence.

Methods: In this review, we identified studies that address the relationship between intervention delivery, and adherence. Selected keywords were used as well as a manual search through the references of appropriate literature, yielding a total of 25 papers for this review.

Results: One suggested explanation for non-adherence to postnatal depression interventions is the delivery approach. This review indicates that the availability of a flexible delivery option may encourage long-term treatment compliance. Due to depressed women's overwhelming responsibilities, an adequate provision for infant care during the treatment process can increase adherence. We also identified that engaging women during treatment session might facilitate high compliance to treatment.

Limitation: Measures of adherence and time points varied considerably in included studies, and the selected keywords may have led to the omission of relevant references.

Conclusion: Non-adherence to postnatal depression intervention should not be seen as the patient's problem as it may represent a fundamental limitation in the delivery of postnatal depression interventions. We advise further research in providing adjunct support to postnatal depression treatments. Adjunct treatment support could give users access to additional wellbeing support and help overcome obstacles to treatment compliance.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Women's Health and Wellness
Issue number1
StatePublished - 12 Jan 2018


  • ijwhw-4-065

    Final published version, 526 KB, PDF-document

    License: CC BY

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