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Attitudes towards animal use and belief in animal mind

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Attitudes towards animal use and belief in animal mind. / Knight, Sarah; Vrij, Aldert; Cherryman, Julie; Nunkoosing, Karl.

In: Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals, Vol. 17, No. 1, 03.2004, p. 43-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Knight, S, Vrij, A, Cherryman, J & Nunkoosing, K 2004, 'Attitudes towards animal use and belief in animal mind', Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 43-62. https://doi.org/10.2752/089279304786991945

APA

Knight, S., Vrij, A., Cherryman, J., & Nunkoosing, K. (2004). Attitudes towards animal use and belief in animal mind. Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals, 17(1), 43-62. https://doi.org/10.2752/089279304786991945

Vancouver

Knight S, Vrij A, Cherryman J, Nunkoosing K. Attitudes towards animal use and belief in animal mind. Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals. 2004 Mar;17(1):43-62. https://doi.org/10.2752/089279304786991945

Author

Knight, Sarah ; Vrij, Aldert ; Cherryman, Julie ; Nunkoosing, Karl. / Attitudes towards animal use and belief in animal mind. In: Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals. 2004 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 43-62.

Bibtex

@article{2c4339231f164814868fa1639e5c9d5d,
title = "Attitudes towards animal use and belief in animal mind",
abstract = "Animals are used by humans in many ways, yet science has paid little attention to the study of human-animal relationships (Melson 2002). In the present study participants (n= 96) completed a questionnaire on attitudes towards animal use and individual differences were examined to determine which characteristics might underlie these attitudes ({\textquoteleft}belief in animal mind{\textquoteright}, age, gender, experience of animals, vegetarianism, political stance, and living area). It emerged that participants held different views for different types of animal use, and that belief in animal mind (BAM) was a powerful and consistent predictor of these attitudes, with BAM together with gender and vegetarianism predicting up to 37% of the variance in attitudes towards animal use. Thus future research should acknowledge the importance of BAM as a major underlying factor of attitudes towards animal use, and should also distinguish between different types of animal use when measuring attitudes. We proposed that the large effect of BAM might be due to increasing interest in animal mind over the past decade.",
author = "Sarah Knight and Aldert Vrij and Julie Cherryman and Karl Nunkoosing",
year = "2004",
month = mar,
doi = "10.2752/089279304786991945",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "43--62",
journal = "Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals",
issn = "0892-7936",
publisher = "Berg Publishers",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Attitudes towards animal use and belief in animal mind

AU - Knight, Sarah

AU - Vrij, Aldert

AU - Cherryman, Julie

AU - Nunkoosing, Karl

PY - 2004/3

Y1 - 2004/3

N2 - Animals are used by humans in many ways, yet science has paid little attention to the study of human-animal relationships (Melson 2002). In the present study participants (n= 96) completed a questionnaire on attitudes towards animal use and individual differences were examined to determine which characteristics might underlie these attitudes (‘belief in animal mind’, age, gender, experience of animals, vegetarianism, political stance, and living area). It emerged that participants held different views for different types of animal use, and that belief in animal mind (BAM) was a powerful and consistent predictor of these attitudes, with BAM together with gender and vegetarianism predicting up to 37% of the variance in attitudes towards animal use. Thus future research should acknowledge the importance of BAM as a major underlying factor of attitudes towards animal use, and should also distinguish between different types of animal use when measuring attitudes. We proposed that the large effect of BAM might be due to increasing interest in animal mind over the past decade.

AB - Animals are used by humans in many ways, yet science has paid little attention to the study of human-animal relationships (Melson 2002). In the present study participants (n= 96) completed a questionnaire on attitudes towards animal use and individual differences were examined to determine which characteristics might underlie these attitudes (‘belief in animal mind’, age, gender, experience of animals, vegetarianism, political stance, and living area). It emerged that participants held different views for different types of animal use, and that belief in animal mind (BAM) was a powerful and consistent predictor of these attitudes, with BAM together with gender and vegetarianism predicting up to 37% of the variance in attitudes towards animal use. Thus future research should acknowledge the importance of BAM as a major underlying factor of attitudes towards animal use, and should also distinguish between different types of animal use when measuring attitudes. We proposed that the large effect of BAM might be due to increasing interest in animal mind over the past decade.

U2 - 10.2752/089279304786991945

DO - 10.2752/089279304786991945

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 43

EP - 62

JO - Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals

JF - Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals

SN - 0892-7936

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 203426