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'Buying' power - interpreting retail change in a circuits of power framework

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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'Buying' power - interpreting retail change in a circuits of power framework. / Hallsworth, Alan; Taylor, Michael.

In: Environment and Planning A, Vol. 28, No. 12, 1996, p. 2125-2137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Hallsworth, A & Taylor, M 1996, ''Buying' power - interpreting retail change in a circuits of power framework', Environment and Planning A, vol. 28, no. 12, pp. 2125-2137. https://doi.org/10.1068/a282125

APA

Hallsworth, A., & Taylor, M. (1996). 'Buying' power - interpreting retail change in a circuits of power framework. Environment and Planning A, 28(12), 2125-2137. https://doi.org/10.1068/a282125

Vancouver

Hallsworth A, Taylor M. 'Buying' power - interpreting retail change in a circuits of power framework. Environment and Planning A. 1996;28(12):2125-2137. https://doi.org/10.1068/a282125

Author

Hallsworth, Alan ; Taylor, Michael. / 'Buying' power - interpreting retail change in a circuits of power framework. In: Environment and Planning A. 1996 ; Vol. 28, No. 12. pp. 2125-2137.

Bibtex

@article{1d4ed1d4851e4662b0b0f78745faba47,
title = "'Buying' power - interpreting retail change in a circuits of power framework",
abstract = "The notion of a new retail geography poses the challenge to produce more critical and rigorous analyses of an important sector of the UK service economy. In this paper we suggest that our understanding of retail processes will be aided by devoting explicit attention to the role of interorganisational power in shaping the commercial environment of the retail sector. Regrettably, many notions of power are undertheorised and static. In particular there is a tendency to treat power as a commodity that may be 'bought' rather than as dynamic and relational. We therefore suggest that a modified version of Clegg's model of circuits of power can add a much-needed dynamic element to a new retall geography. The circuits of power framework is applied to a case study from UK food retailing. The approach clarifies the underlying and inherently dynamic processes of power-based inequality that are driving change.",
author = "Alan Hallsworth and Michael Taylor",
year = "1996",
doi = "10.1068/a282125",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "2125--2137",
journal = "Environment and Planning A",
issn = "0308-518X",
publisher = "Pion Ltd.",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'Buying' power - interpreting retail change in a circuits of power framework

AU - Hallsworth, Alan

AU - Taylor, Michael

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - The notion of a new retail geography poses the challenge to produce more critical and rigorous analyses of an important sector of the UK service economy. In this paper we suggest that our understanding of retail processes will be aided by devoting explicit attention to the role of interorganisational power in shaping the commercial environment of the retail sector. Regrettably, many notions of power are undertheorised and static. In particular there is a tendency to treat power as a commodity that may be 'bought' rather than as dynamic and relational. We therefore suggest that a modified version of Clegg's model of circuits of power can add a much-needed dynamic element to a new retall geography. The circuits of power framework is applied to a case study from UK food retailing. The approach clarifies the underlying and inherently dynamic processes of power-based inequality that are driving change.

AB - The notion of a new retail geography poses the challenge to produce more critical and rigorous analyses of an important sector of the UK service economy. In this paper we suggest that our understanding of retail processes will be aided by devoting explicit attention to the role of interorganisational power in shaping the commercial environment of the retail sector. Regrettably, many notions of power are undertheorised and static. In particular there is a tendency to treat power as a commodity that may be 'bought' rather than as dynamic and relational. We therefore suggest that a modified version of Clegg's model of circuits of power can add a much-needed dynamic element to a new retall geography. The circuits of power framework is applied to a case study from UK food retailing. The approach clarifies the underlying and inherently dynamic processes of power-based inequality that are driving change.

U2 - 10.1068/a282125

DO - 10.1068/a282125

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 2125

EP - 2137

JO - Environment and Planning A

JF - Environment and Planning A

SN - 0308-518X

IS - 12

ER -

ID: 137125